Sunday, November 20, 2011

HOLLYWOOD SPY'S SPOTLIGHT ON STEVEN SPIELBERGS EPIC DRAMA "WAR HORSE" WITH JEREMY IRVINE, TOM HIDDLESTON, EMILY WATSON AND BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH

One of the most beautiful movies which await us in cinemas this December (premiering in the festive atmosphere of Christmas Day) is DreamWorks Pictures' WAR HORSE helmed by famous director Steven Spielberg, an epic adventure for audiences of all ages,  a tale of loyalty, hope and tenacity set against a sweeping canvas of rural England and Europe during the First World War. With touching story, inspiring atmosphere, epic art direction and music by Oscar winning John Williams, the film will surely bring a memorable experience in cinemas.

THE WAR HORSE STORY
The story begins with the remarkable friendship between a horse named Joey and a young man called Albert, who tames and trains him. When they are forcefully parted, the film follows the extraordinary journey of the horse as he moves through the war,
changing and inspiring the lives of all those he meets - British cavalry, German soldiers, and a French farmer and his granddaughter - before the story reaches its emotional climax in the heart of No Man's Land. The First World War is experienced through the journey of this horse, an odyssey of joy and sorrow,
passionate friendship and high adventure. WAR HORSE is one of the great stories of friendship and war - a successful book, it was turned into a hugely successful international theatrical hit that is arriving on Broadway next year. It now comes to screen in an epic adaptation by one of the greatest directors in film history.
WAR HORSE TIDBITS
Beside being directed by legendary Steven Spielberg, who returns to making heart warming and deeply touching movies after SAVING PRIVATE RYAN, the film has a lovely cast including young Jeremy Irvine (we shall also be watching him as Pip in
THE GREAT EXPECTATIONS beside Helena Bonham Carter and Ralph Fiennes) and British stars Tom Hiddleston from THOR, Emily Watson, Toby Kebbell, David Thewlis, Benedict Cumberbatch, Peter Mullan ...  The film is based on a children's novel by Michael Morpurgo published back in the 80's. This will be the first Spielberg's movie to be edited digitally,
he cut his films manually so far. The film might score good at next year Oscars.Spielberg's next film is $100 million worth historical drama LINCOLN with Tommy Lee Jones, Lee Pace, Joseph Gordon Levitt and Daniel Day Lewis, and after that he is going sf with ROBOPOCALYPSE.

30 comments:

  1. I haven't been able to bring myself to get excited for this.

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  2. ah, you vampires never liked heartwarming stories :PPP

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  3. We shall see, I have little faith in Speilberg anymore, after that garbage Indiana Jones and War of The Worlds movies. But you never know.

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  4. and I expect TINTIN to be garbage too, especially since it is praised by fanboys, which can only mean it is a boring one.

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  5. *sniff* I was tearing up at the trailer. I can't help it, I love horses.

    I may have to wait for the DVD for this one. I hate sitting in a theater and crying during a movie. It's so embarrassing when the lights come on.

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  6. yep, I said it myself, if the horsey dies in the film, I might die as well, can't stand sad endings :(

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  7. Dez,what exactly makes someone a fanboy to you?I've noticed you use the term a lot

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  8. people who adore Tarantino, Fincher, Nolan, who have violent taste, hang around Rotten Tomatoes and have zero moral values, refinement and maturity, but are dangerous because they can influence the success of a certain film with their negative marketing.

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  9. Don't you think that is being a tad bit judgmental?Different people have different tastes in films. Just because they may have a different opinion than you in films doesn't mean they are dangerous people who have zero moral values.

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  10. This looks great! Looking forward to it.

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  11. i love noble horses... not those sissy ones.

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  12. No thanks, I'm getting tired of horse movies.

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  13. I'm very interested in this because of the First World War setting. I think I've mentioned here before that I am a student of this era and am currently working on my own WWI project. To me there is not enough out there film-wise about this war.

    Besides that, it looks utterly amazing and I love cast. Thanks for the terrific spotlight, Dezz. :)

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  14. I hope this is not going to be a film that you have high hopes for and it leaves you in pieces on the theatre floor.

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  15. @Dirty
    well, I knew you wouldn't understand what I mean, Dirty, and I knew you would turn it into a matter of taste, even though this is not a superficial, but very deep problem of the modern world. You can't really talk about morals and ethics in people like fanboys who literally get orgasms watching little, underaged, girls shooting guns and wielding swords in films, or people who enjoy watching women beating each other mindlessly or even getting beat by men (remember for example the scene in KILL BILL where Uma kills Vivica Fox in a horrid bloodshed while her little daughter is watching it - and it is all shot as a "fun" scene). The same goes for people whose main, and often the only, cinematic pleasure, is watching criminals, killers, assassins, mobsters and thieves in movies. Not all, but a lot of kids who grow up in this way see all those things in a glamorous way, they see violent people as heroes and role models, and then they take all of those dangerous things for granted in the real life too. Such taste in movies often leads to a very dangerous insensitivity towards violence and immoral behaviour in real life too, and such people are then easy on accepting wars, aggression and similar as methods for solving problems. Not to mention that most of them will see positive things in films (like love, emotions, laughter) as something worth mocking.

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  16. @Lavie
    glad you like it :)

    @Maybe
    horses are always nice, and raccoons too :)

    @DWei
    better luck next time, DWei!

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  17. @Melsy
    glad you liked the spotlight, Melsy, I know how much you find that period of history interesting. It started a lot of changes in the world and it shaped the world as it is today, bad or good, who knows, however, I know you will agree with me, that even after two world wars, the society hasn't learned much and films can sometimes teach us some important lessons if they are done in a correct and non-biased way

    @Clarissa
    I also hope it won't leave us heartbroken.

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  18. I'm really looking forward to this film. Thanks so much for the spotlight on it Dezz. I know a little about the play because of John Tams music for it mostly. Wonder if I could make it to Broadway to see it next year? I applaud more movies about World War I also. We know too little and have forgotten even more.

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  19. you are taking me with you to see the Broadway play, yes? :))

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  20. This looks like a real tearjerker. I read an interview w/ Hiddleston that he kept crying as he read the script. This could very well be a breakout role for young Jeremy Irvine, he's got such sad eyes, even just looking at that poster makes me rather teary-eyed :)

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  21. Hiddleston is one of the main reasons to watch this one, if you ask me, Flixy :)

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  22. WWI certainly did shape our world as we know it. Not many people realize that as they tend to think of it as a war from another age. WWII is ancient history to many people so they don't care to look farther back than that, but WWI's causes had a direct effect on the outbreak of WWII. I do agree, film is a great teaching tool, but like any tool, can only achieve results if used in the proper manner.

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  23. This movie looks great, sort of reminds me of Black Beauty, without the grim WW1 overshadowing the entire plot.

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  24. I am SO watching War Horse...the view is stunning, Benedict is there (tho I hate that hideous mustache), and it's about animal...it's always sadder than human story.

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  25. @Melsy
    it literally changed the world, because many new countries appeared on the map, my own Yugoslavia included. It also destroyed a number of huge empires, which was actually good. My own Vojvodina was taken from the Hapsburg monarchy and given to Serbia, which pretty much ruined its later development and my own city, from an imperial town became a provincial town at the frontier :( Not to mention how many people died in WW1, Serbia, for example lost about million people, which was one fifth or something like that of the whole number of its citizens at that time :( And we were left without men who mostly died at battlefields.

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  26. @Rgers
    glad you like it :)

    @Novia
    you don't like Cumbertbatch's mustaches? (love the rhyme) :)))
    I think he looks quite becoming with it :)

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  27. Hahaha it does rhyme ;)
    Hmmm...Iamnot really into men with mustache

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  28. that goes for women with mustache too :)

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