Friday, January 8, 2021

PREMIUM SPOTLIGHT ON SOMEONE HAS TO DIE SPANISH PERIOD SET SERIES STREAMING OVER AT NETFLIX: HOMOPHOBIA, CONSERVATISM AND FAMILY OBLIGATIONS IN 1950S SPAIN

   SOMEONE HAS TO DIE   
NEW NETFLIX MINI SERIES
Someone Has To Die streams over at Netflix
Earlier this winter we talked about the historical brutality of homophobia in Mexico when we spotlighted Dance of the 41 drama, and the same topic appears in their new period set mini TV series SOMEONE HAS TO DIE which is available for watching over at Netflix. Would you believe that they even had special prisons for torturing gay people? This three episode drama, starring Cecilia Suárez, Ernesto Alterio, Ester Expósito, Alejandro Speitzer, Carlos Cuevas, Isaac Hernández, Mariola Fuentes and Carmen Maura, is set in conservative 1950s Spain, where the alleged relationship between a young man and a Mexican ballerino creates an uproar of harrowing consequences.

SOMEONE HAS TO DIE IS SET
in Spain, 1954. The Falcon family enjoys all the trappings of high society, even as Francisco Franco’s nationalist dictatorship crushes dissent under the bootheel of the state and shuttles undesirables into prisons and factory labor. Gregorio (Ernesto Altiero), the father, is a Francoist bureaucrat and
This historical mini series airs in three episodes
domestic tyrant who rules over the family’s home and social fortunes with his scheming, traditionalist mother in tow. His wife Mina (Cecilia Suarez), originally from Mexico but long a member of Spain’s elite, sees the greater world changing but is stuck under Gregorio’s thumb. The Falcons’ only son
The series was written and created by Manolo Caro
Gabino (Alejandro Speitzer) has just arrived home after a decade spent with Mina’s family in Mexico. Gregorio has arranged to marry Gabino to Cayetana (Ester Esposito), favorite daughter of the wealthy Aldama family. The match would secure the Falcons in society, and grease the wheels for state
The series comes from the House of Flowers creators
labor contracts to run through Senor Aldama’s network of factories. Papa’s seemingly got it all sorted. Problem is, Gabino’s come back from Mexico with a “friend,” a lithe young dancer named Lazaro (Isaac Hernandez). And children of any age or privilege rarely do what their parents tell them.

10 comments:

  1. Lots of drama in this family. I'd opt for the hot young dancer too and risk the consequences.

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  2. The hot dancer is a red herring, but what amazed me is that the series tells us that Mexico was a gay haven in 1954 (?) It's true that sodomy had been outlawed in Mexico in 1874, but there were other ways to put homosexuals in jail, and the social estigma and persecution were awful in that very machista country.

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    1. Seems like a very nasty country to me. In my country you can still get beaten up in the streets for being gay, but we don't have systematic jails for gay people, and our prime minister is a lesbian.

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    2. Well gay rights are extremely important in Spain since the 80s, and same sex marriage is allowed since 2005, something that is still not happening in Eastern Europe. And the series takes place during a totalitarian regime, but in 1954 homosexuality still was considered a crime in United States and the United Kingdom

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    3. Yes, and I don't see it happening any time soon in Eastern Europe, sadly.

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  3. Used to love drama...now I prefer simple entertaining ones.

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    Replies
    1. I hear you! That is why I always have at least two sitcoms on my weekly watching.

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  4. They had specific prisons for torturing gay people? Disgusting.. Did people not have a conscience back then?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, they would torture them to reveal the names of other gays. They have a very strong Catholic church there, so I'm not overly surprised, evil usually goes with the church.

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