Tuesday, January 25, 2022

BREAKING NEWS: SEE EMILIA SCHULE AS MARIE ANTOINETTE IN CANAL PLUS' NEW HISTORICAL TV SERIES ON THE FRENCH QUEEN WITH JAMES PUREFOY, LOUIS CUNNINGHAM

 MARIE ANTOINETTE TV SERIES
FIRST ROYAL PHOTO IS HERE!
We have the first photo from new historical series MARIE ANTOINETTE which will air on Canal + and BBC later this year. The eight part series, starring Emilia Schule in the lead role follows the famed queen Marie
Emilia Schule takes the lead role
Antoinette, who was the last queen of France before the French Revolution. James Purefoy also stars with Louis Cunningham as King Louis XVI! 
 
  MARIE ANTOINETTE 
was barely 14 years old when she left Austria and her mother empress Maria Theresa to marry the Dauphin in France. She is still a stubborn and dissipated young child who must comply with French rules, which are numerous and complicated. The young princess quickly suffers from not being able to live her life as she sees fit. She is constantly under pressure to carry on the Bourbon line. A mission more complicated than expected: even if the relationship between Marie Antoinette
Scenes for the $23 million series were shot in Versailles on Mondays when the French palace is closed for the public.
and Louis XVI improves over time, it will take them seven years to consummate their marriage. From the young runner-up to the queen of style, a true fashion icon, Marie Antoinette quickly impresses with her charisma and naturalness. She will gradually understand the codes and secrets of the French
Deborah Davis is writing and producing the new series
court and completely recreate Versailles in her image! But her success stirs up jealousy and rivalry. Defamatory pamphlets and persistent rumors about her private life undermine her reputation. It will take a lot of courage and dignity to defeat her numerous enemies at the Versailles court. Read more here.

19 comments:

  1. I like Emilia very much (even if she almost dragged Jannis to the altar). So, are we watching Gilded Age tonight? Let's not talk about war or rumors of war until we have definite news.

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    1. I will defo download it this week and watch it probably on Thursday as I have finished NEW GOLD MOUNTAIN and need something new to watch :)

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  2. History theme base films are increasing! There are many new film series here but not good. Marie Antoniette sounds good. Also BBC's films and documentaries are better.

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    1. BBC programmes have not been good in recent years, but they were before that. Hope they return the old quality as I miss it.

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  3. I'm definitely going to read more. I like these history lessons. Hopefully it's historically accurate.

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    1. Well, my own opinion is that she was a stupid and superficial tart, but the series will defo be mild towards her as she is their main focus.

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    2. Yes. She married at 14, spent seven years as a virgin wife and when she was twenty-two, and already had a daughter, she took one single lover, a relationship that lasted throughout her lifetime. I guess some would call her a tart.
      She was not highly educated. Her teachers despaired over her laziness and frivolity of mind (not her lack of intelligence). So, one could call her stupid, barring the fact that she was an accomplished musician, trained by Gluck, danced, sang, and played (well) several instruments. She revived French music bringing with her the German school of music and encouraging the development of opera.
      She was frivolous and loved pretty things, so she encouraged furniture making and developed three industries that are still linked to France: hairdressing, dressmaking and perfume making. Hence, she was superficial, but one forgets the number of jobs her superficiality generated.
      She was imprudent, irresponsible, a spindrift and naïve, but not the monster her enemies depicted.

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    3. I did not mean tart in a sexual way, but in being vain and superficial and empty brained. And frivolity as you said. Don't forget that while she enjoyed lavish dresses, parties, food and furniture, building new palaces and enjoying music, people were living like animals, possibly even worse, so she defo does not support any high praise. But most of them royals were nasty, selfish pricks, that is how they were raised. Most of Maria Theresa's kids were empty headed and dull, but she did manage to marry them off and secure Habsburgs ruling half of Europe through marriages.

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    4. I understand that a committed socialist like you would visualize any person of privilege as an enemy of the people. But MA wasn’t any different than other queens of her time, any different from other women of her times. She wasn’t ruling on her own like her mother or Catherine the Great. She lived in a country where women did not rule, she was just expected to provide heirs and follow the court’s protocol. The wives of Napoleon were much dumber and more selfish, and Empress Alexandra of Russia was much more harmful.
      Moreover, privilege is still very much associated with people in power even in leftist countries. There is an elite in China, Maduro lives in luxury, Fidel Castro died a millionaire, I don’t see Tzar Vlad wearing rags.
      That MA starved people in France with heavy taxes to support her lifestyle is an old and debunked myth. The reason behind the unfair taxation was to support the American Revolution. In aiding United States to free themselves from Great Britain, France ruined herself. MA tried doing more than other aristocrats. She generated jobs, was a patron of poor artists, adopted poor children. While living at Trianon tried to lead a simpler life, at a point she commissioned simple linen dresses for herself and her ladies in waiting, and the silk weavers of Paris were so outraged they marched in protest demanding the Queen to wear silk again.

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    5. That is a nice way of defending her, albeit a bit overwrought one, but in the end it isn't you or me who will pass the final judgement on her but the poor people who had to suffer through her and hers husband's rule: and they did give her exactly the justice she deserved: a bit of a chop chop. I just dearly hope we see that juicy part in the series LOL

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    6. Brrrr! Someone is in a bloodthirsty mood today! I apologize if I came out as too obsessive, but I love good historical debates. Yes, you probably will get your chop chop time, and you’ll see that is not the poor people that will oversee the guillotine. In fact, the architect of the Revolution was the bourgeoisie (with the aid of some aristos), the first professional middle class of France. The most suffering ones, went on suffering, or were chopped chopped themselves. In fact, the peasants got so fed up with the Terror, many turned Royalists. Alas, poor people seldom get to write history.

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    7. I do ever so adore me when royals get chop chopped. I'm a bit disappointed I won't see it with Lizzie the Second, and I kinda love Charlie and Kamila so I won't wish them bad, but I always support the revolution! Freedom for the people, down with the tyrants :)

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    8. On to the barricades! But don’t forget revolution breeds tyranny, and not all tyrants have blue blood.

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    9. As one of our most famous writers Mika Antic said (you've seen yesterday at Facebook that I did a review of his book for our biggest publisher) - revolutions usually start with freedom and end up with some serious shit.

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  4. I like Malena's take on her. While she may have been a spoiled tart in the eyes of many, and probably was a pain in the ass to deal with, her influence really is undeniable. It's like she was a Kardashian of her day. Easy to hate, but damned if not a powerhouse in her own right.

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  5. Thank You, Theresa. MA was a pain, she was haughty, sharp-tongued, mocked people, and made enemies easily. The curious thing is that she made enemies among her class, not the lower. In fact, she seems to have been a lenient head of household, and several of her servants were guillotined for trying to assist her escape.
    One thing I liked about her is that she was a wonderful mother. This was very uncommon in women of her time. She not only had four c biological children, but she also adopted several more, including a Black child.
    Unlike Kimmie, she never thought to be an influencer, she didn’t seek to be an arbiter of elegance like Sisi or empress Eugenie. In fact, MA wanted to isolate herself at le Petite Trianon with her coterie of friends and was criticized for it.

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    1. I imagine she did not live her life to be admired by the masses. I read something the other day about you can be a hero or a villain in any story, it just depends on who the narrator is. I'm sure she had more redeeming qualities that we never head about. Her story has probably just been told by too many who wanted to paint her as a villain. Not saying she wasn't a pain for her time, but in this day in age, she probably would have been considered a saint.

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    2. There is actually a movement to canonize Marie Antoinette. That is a bit too excessive. Indeed, historical revisionism (and historical fiction) is bent on persuading us to change our views on events and public figures. I come from a country where a quarter of the population still thinks Hitler was the Good Guy. When I think of French queens that people remember they are all villainesses (the Medici Girls, The She Wolf of France) or nonentities. If we remember MA is because she represents things that we associate with France such as fashion, refinement, culture.

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GIVE SOME LOVE TO YOUR DEZZY :)